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Bark-About Hike to Juncrock Timber Sale / Comments Due!

On October 12th, folks went with BARK to visit the Juncrock Timber Sale in the Mt. Hood National Forest. We went to see first hand what healthy stands of forest the Barlow Ranger District wants to log in the name of eradicating Indian Paint fungus and other natural diseases.
On October 12th, folks went with BARK to visit the Juncrock Timber Sale in the Mt. Hood National Forest. We went to see first hand what healthy stands of forest the Barlow Ranger District wants to log in the name of eradicating Indian Paint fungus and other natural diseases. A Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) (posted at http://www.bark-out.org/tsdb/detail.php?sale=jrck) has been completed for the Juncrock Timber Sale, and it is critical that the Forest Service hear from as many of us as possible that we don't' want this splendid eastside forest logged. When the comment period is over, the Forest Service will render a final decision, so now is your chance to make a difference!

COMMENT DEADLINE: MONDAY, OCT. 27!
Even if you didn't go on the hike, take our word for it, and watch the video (see link below), it is very important if you want to help save these healthy stands of forest that you send letters objecting to this egregious sale to: Becky Nelson, Barlow Ranger District, USFS, 780 N.E. Court St., Dufur, Oregon. (Please also email Bark a copy at sandi@bark-out.org.

Our goal is 200 personally written letters on this sale, and we only have less than a week left to meet this goal. You can visit the area on your own or with the Juncrock Adopt-A-Sale team. (call Bark at 331-0374). Driving Directions: From Portland, take highway 26 east approximately 13 miles past the junction with highway 35. Take a left on highway 216 toward Bear Springs and Maupin. In approximately 3 miles, turn left of 2130. The timber sale units are off roads 2139, 4310, 2313. Maps are available at http://www.bark-out.org/tsdb/detail.php?sale=jrck..

. Some Ideas for Your Juncrock Comments:

  • Please choose Alternative I, the No Action Alternative
  • Logging to remove "disease" is scientifically indefensible. It will harm the forest and many species. The "disease" found in Juncrock, such as Red-Ring Rot, Brown Cubicle Butt Rot, Indian Paint Fungus, and Mistletoe are a natural part of a forest and are creating needed habitat for many species. In addition, tree disease can increase the number of snags (standing dead trees) per acre. Snags are habitat for the important and threatened Northern Spotted Owl among other endangered critters.
  • Please do not log any old growth. Logging old growth, such as that found in Unit 8, will not improve forest health. Studies show that old growth forests contain more biomass and biodiversity than younger forests, therefore increasing the forest's ability to recover from disaster. Many old growth-dependent species are going extinct, and it is irresponsible to log what little old growth remains.
  • Many areas in Juncrock suffer from soil degradation from compaction and road building. No logging should be conducted until existing compacted landscape has had time to recover.
  • Streams throughout the Juncrock sale show damage from the presence of cattle, ie/erosion and excrement. Allowing cattle to have continued access to delicate riparian areas is totally irresponsible. Please remove all grazing allotments from this area. The continued negative impacts of grazing harms aquatic ecosystems and damages watersheds.

    To view the video of the hike, go to: www.philosopherseed.org

Short Video 22.Oct.2003 15:12

Jim Lockhart eagleye@PhilosopherSeed.org

A short video requesting commentary on the Juncrock Timber Sale in Mt. Hood National Forest....
DSL/CABLE Stream
56K Stream


Sample Comment 22.Oct.2003 17:32

quill

SAMPLE COMMENT:

RE: Junrock Timber Sale
ATTN: Becky Nelson
Barlow Ranger District, USFS
780 N.E. Court St.
Dufur, Oregon 97201.

October 9, 2003

Dear Ms. Nelson,

Thank you for considering my comment on the DEIS for the Junrock Timber Sale in the Mt. Hood National Forest. I practice permaculture techniques to a large extent and would encourage you and your staff to take some courses on permaculture when deciding that natural cyclical diseases need to be eradicated without giving mother nature a chance to use these diseases as she always has done to achieve and restore balance in all natural ecosystems.

The reason I think you and your staff need some permaculture training is because when I lived on the east coast and worked with forest managers of national forests and wilderness areas (yes there are some left in the east believe it or not), they were familiar with the concepts of natural restoration principles and many were working to restore the natural balance by doing as little as possible to allow the forest to return to historical patterns that existed before destructive resource exploitation threatened to turn the eastern forests into monocrop even-aged tree farms.

As just a few examples of the type of "leave it alone" philosophy that I implore your agency adopt, before it is too late, I want to point out the following indisputable facts your scientists will corraborate, since they took the same microbiology and carrying capacity of natural systems that I did while studying for my masters degree:

1) The "disease" found in Juncrock, such as Red-Ring Rot, Brown Cubicle Butt Rot, Indian Paint Fungus, and Mistletoe are a natural part of a forest and are creating needed habitat for many species. In addition, tree disease can and will (if left alone) increase the number of snags per acre, a requirement inherent in your forest plan.
2) Snags are habitat for the important and threatened Northern Spotted Owl among other endangered critters and indicator species that show the health of a forest by their ability to thrive there...
3) Logging to remove "disease" is scientifically indefensible. This approach will harm the forest and many species, and strip the soil of it's ability to regenerate by removing important nutrients the forest has relied upon for millenia for recycling nutrients.
4) Many areas in Juncrock suffer from soil degradation from compaction and road building. No logging should be conducted until existing compacted landscape has had time to recover.
5) Allowing cattle to have continued access to delicate riparian areas is totally irresponsible.The continued negative impacts of grazing harms aquatic ecosystems and damages watersheds. Streams throughout the Juncrock sale show erosion and other soil and water damage from the presence of cattle. Please remove all grazing allotments from this area.
6) Studies show that old growth forests contain more biomass and biodiversity than younger forests, therefore increasing the forest's ability to recover from disaster. Many old growth-dependent species are going extinct, and it is irresponsible to log what little old growth remains. Please do not log any old growth. Logging old growth, such as that found in Unit 8, will not improve forest health.

You and your staff have all taken basic forest science classes and are well aware of these facts, I'm sure. Please use your training to make decisions that will benefit future generations of humans by considering future generations of flora and fauna that depend on the forest for their own survival so they can return the inputs of energy back into the system that gave them/us life.

Please choose Alternative I, the No Action Alternative. Please do not log any old growth

SIncerely,