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Tues Sept 23 is National Call in Day to Oppose Bush's "Healthy" Forest Act

The US Senate is preparing to vote on misguided wildfire legislation as early as this week! Please contact Senator Wyden after reading the following alert, and share with other concerned citizens as well.

The so-called "Healthy Forests Restoration Act," HR 1904, has a very high likelihood of being taken up by the Senate within a few days. It is up to us to call on our elected leaders to stand up and protect forests and to stop the reckless assault on our National Forests pushed forward by the Bush Administration and many in Congress.


To look up your Senators' direct office phone numbers, faxes, or emails go to: < http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm>.
To find the name of your Senators' go to:
 http://capwiz.com/vys/dbq/officials/

Senators Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Barbara Boxer (D-CA) have introduced the "Forestry and Community Assistance Act of 2003" (S. 1453), which is based on the best available science on protecting homes, communities and municipal drinking water. S. 1453 provides funding and establishes programs for truly restoring forests and watersheds degraded by activities such as fire suppression, logging and road building, and funds watershed restoration work
on State and Tribal lands.
In this alert

I. Contact Senator Wyden to oppose HR 1904, the so-called 'Healthy
Forests Restoration Act' and backroom deals to get it passed
via the Interior Appropriations bill.
II. National Call-In Day on forest fire legislation, Tuesday, September 23
III. Write a Letter to the Editor!
IV. General Accounting Office says Forest Service
'misleads' public regarding wildfire spending


I. Contact Senator Wyden to oppose HR 1904, the so called 'Healthy
Forests Restoration Act' and backroom deals to get it passed
via the Interior Appropriations bill. Call his offices at 202-224-5244
(Washington, DC), 503-326-7525 (Portland),
503-589-4555 (Salem),
541-431-0229 (Eugene),
541-330-9142 (Bend).
Email comments via
www.senate.gov/~wyden/mail.htm , fax #
202-228-2717.

The US Senate will likely begin debate on the Interior Appropriations
bill as early as Wednesday, September 17, 2003 or at the beginning
of the week of September 22. Undersecretary of Agriculture Mark
Rey is leading discussions with Senate Republicans and some Democrats
in order to cut a backroom deal on HR 1904 and attach the legislation
as a 'rider' to the Interior Appropriations bill.
Senator Wyden has been party to the talks with the Administration and sources say a deal may be cut with Wyden, other Democrats and the White House by the end of the week.

TAKE ACTION TODAY:

1. Please call, email and fax Senator Wyden at the above numbers
tell him to stand firm and to not cut a deal to have provisions
of the 'Healthy Forests Restoration Act' appear as amendments
to the Senate Interior Appropriations bill.
Senator Wyden should not cut any deal which guts the National
Environmental Policy Act; excludes the public by repealing the Appeals Reform Act; excludes Judicial Review or makes Judicial Review
of Fuels Reduction and Logging projects meaningless (e.g. changing
the balance of harms); and which contains no environmental
safeguards such as old growth and roadless protection or
requirements that money be spent where it will be most effective at
protecting homes and communities - in the Community Protection
Zone within 500 yards of communities.

Background:
HR 1904, the so-called 'Healthy Forests Restoration Act' which
was cosponsored by Oregon's Greg Walden (R-Hood River), passed
the US House of Representatives last May. Now, the US Senate
is poised to take a vote on the bill sometime in September. However,
provisions of the destructive logging legislation very likely
could appear as amendments to the Senate Interior Approriations
bill as early as THIS WEEK.

In short, HR 1904 would:

1. Not ensure any increased protection for communities at risk
from fires and could in fact increase fire risk by encouraging
logging of older, fire resistant trees.

2. Focus logging in the backcountry miles away from communities
at risk.

3. Take away citizens' democratic rights to participate in decisions
about how our public lands are managed.

4. Encourage the use of 'stewardship' contracts which pay logging
companies for their work with large, merchantable trees because
the bill offers no independent funding.

5. Interfere with an independent judiciary by restricting the
public's democratic rights to seek redress in court over destructive
federal logging projects.

YOUR CALLS, FAXES and EMAILS TO SENATOR WYDEN ARE NEEDED!
Please send the following messages to Senator Wyden:

Rather than suspend laws to log mature trees, sensible fire legislation would require that the Forest Service and Bureau
of Land Management focus on real community protection, not
backcountry logging projects.

Common sense fire legislation would:

1. Provide direct funding to fire proof homes and remove hazardous
fuels within the areas immediately around homes and within 500
yards of communities - in the Community Protection Zone (CPZ).

2. Shift agency personnel skilled in brush clearing and thinning
projects over the the CPZs and away from low priority backcountry
areas.

3. Restore natural fires and utilize prescribed burns.

4. Protect mature, old growth and roadless forests from commercial
logging and road building

5. Work within existing environmental laws with judicial oversight
to ensure public participation and environmental protection.

6. Receive direct funding from Congress rather than relying on
'stewardship' or 'goods for services' contracts which encourage
logging abuse.

7. Direct at least 85% of fuel reduction money directly to states
and local communities to pay for work within the 500 yard CPZ.
Eighty five percent of lands within the CPZ are non-federal,
owned by state, tribal, county and private landowners.

Many environmental groups are supporting an alternative: S. 1453,
the Forestry and Community Assistance Act of 2003. Sponsored
by Senators Leahy and Boxer this bill provides a better approach
for responsible fuel reduction around communities. While the
bill has some problems, the Leahy-Boxer bill is still by far
the best alternative in the Senate right now and Senator Wyden
should be urged to support it or the above principles.

Contact Wyden this week!!

II. National Call-In Day on forest fire legislation, Tuesday,
September 23

While calling Wyden as soon as possible and throughout the remainder
of the Senate session is of the utmost importance, we need to
keep up the pressure in many ways. Please mark your calendars,
participate, and activate all of your networks for the National
Call in Day on September 23, 2003. The goal of the National Call in Day is to get as many calls and faxes as we possibly can to the Senate to block efforts to pass the Bush Administration's Healthy Forests
Initiative.
Use the information on what's wrong with HR 1904
and what a sensible
solution looks like above in your calls, emails
and faxes.

Senator Wyden's contact info:

www.senate.gov/~wyden/mail.htm , fax a letter to
202-228-2717,
or call his offices at 202-224-5244 (DC),
503-326-7525 (Portland),
503-589-4555 (Salem), 541-431-0229 (Eugene),
541-330-9142 (Bend).


III. Write a Letter to the Editor!

One of the best ways to Wyden's attention is through the editoral
page of your local newspaper. Please write letters urging Senators
Wyden to oppose HR 1904 and support sensible alternatives which
protect our forests and environmental safeguards while protecting
homes and communities.

Find your local paper's opinion page contact info at the link
below and write a letter today!

 http://capwiz.com/vys/dbq/media/

Check out
 http://www.oregon.sierraclub.org/alerts/fire.asp
for several sample letters to the editor

IV. General Accounting Office says Forest Service
'misleads' public regarding wildfire spending

from the Oregonian
9/16/03

U.S. agencies criticized on tracking fire funds
MICHAEL MILSTEIN

Federal agencies do not know if the millions of dollars they're
spending to dampen wildfire risk on public lands is going where
it will best protect homes and property, a federal review has
found.

Agencies also mislead the public by claiming credit for "treating"
overgrown forests when it may not reduce fire threats or must
be repeated to do any good, says a report by the U.S. General
Accounting Office released Monday.

The report coincided with the Monday opening of an annual meeting
of the National Association of State Foresters in Portland dealing
in part with rising fire risk across the country.

Several state foresters questioned Bush administration officials
about ways of lessening fire danger without draining funds from
other programs. Decades of fire suppression have left many forests
clogged with flammable underbrush.

Mark Rey, the Bush administration's undersecretary of agriculture
who oversees the U.S. Forest Service, said officials were trying
to prioritize projects to get the most for each dollar.

The administration is also controlling costs by curtailing lengthy
environmental reviews for certain forest thinning projects. But
he said further progress must come through a bill in Congress
to accelerate thinning even more.

The administration strongly backs the bill, co-sponsored by Rep.
Greg Walden, R-Ore., to further restrict reviews and limit court
delays of logging projects sometimes challenged by environmental
groups.

But the General Accounting Office, the investigative arm of Congress,
reported that opposition was not a leading factor in slowing
projects that clear out built-up tinder.

Instead, the main reasons projects could not proceed were the
weather and the diversion of funds to fight wildfires, the GAO
found after visiting land managers across the West. Managers
usually cannot light prescribed burns or use heavy equipment
to clear away undergrowth in dry, windy conditions.

About a third of the delays grew from a shift in money from preventative projects to firefighting, which last year cost
more than $1 billion, the GAO said.

Lesser reasons for delays included public resistance, regulatory
demands and unpredictable funding. At one Oregon national forest,
officials gave up on a prescribed burning project because of
local complaints about smoke.

A top priority in the drive to reduce fire hazards is supposed
to be the "urban-wildland interface" -- where housing intersects
with fire-prone wildlands. But federal agencies have defined
the interface so vaguely that it could include subdivisions near forests, drainages far from homes or public land near powerlines,
the GAO said.

So money directed at the interface may or may not go toward protecting
homes, it said.

Other priority areas for fire hazard funding are also defined
so vaguely that almost any acre of public land in the West could
qualify, the GAO said. That leaves no clear way to make sure
money goes where it's needed most.

Federal officials estimate that about 190 million acres are at
high risk of wildfire, but say the margin of error is so great
it could be anywhere from 90 to 200 million acres.

Please Call Your Senators: Senate May Take Up Interior Bill TODAY! 17.Sep.2003 10:06

update

The Senate will likely begin debate on the Interior Appropriations bill as
early as TODAY, Wednesday, September 17, 2003 or at the beginning of the
week of September 22. There are rumors that Undersecretary of Agriculture
Mark Rey is leading discussions with Senate Republicans and some Democrats
in order to cut a backroom deal on HR 1904 in order to attach the
legislation as a rider to the Interior Appropriations Bill.

In addition to the threat of HR 1904 being attached to the Appropriations
bill, there will likely be a pro-active amendment to strike a bad Tongass
rider that was inserted in the Interior bill during the Committee mark-up
earlier this year by Senator Stevens (R-AK). The anti-judicial review
Tongass rider would cripple the public's due process and slams the
courthouse door on citizens whose interests may be threatened by proposed
logging projects in the Tongass National Forest.

The rider makes it virtually impossible for citizens to challenge logging
projects by limiting to 30 days the time available to file lawsuits on more
than 73 Tongass logging projects including over a dozen sales where all or
portions of the sale area are currently covered by the Roadless Area
Conservation Rule. The rider also interferes with the independence of the
federal judiciary by limiting to 180 days the time the District Federal
Court in Alaska has to review and render a final decision on lawsuits
regarding logging projects on the Tongass National Forest; which could force
the court to consider challenges to federal timber sales before hearing
other cases on its docket.

Please Call your Senators and ask that they:

1. Oppose efforts to add HR 1904 (the so-called "Healthy Forests
Restoration Act of 2003) to the Interior Appropriations bill.

2. Support the motion to strike the Tongass anti-judicial review rider from
the Interior Appropriations bill.


You can reach your Senators by calling the capitol switchboard number at
202-224-3121. To look up your Senators' direct office phone numbers, faxes,
or emails go to:
 http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm
To find the name of your Senators' go to:
 http://capwiz.com/vys/dbq/officials/


Lisa Dix
National Forest Program Director
American Lands Alliance
 ldix@americanlands.org
Ph: 202-547-9105; Fax: 202-547-9213

|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
Andrew George
Campaign Coordinator
National Forest Protection Alliance
PO Box 215
Chapel Hill, NC 27514-0215
ph: 919 933 3073
cell: 828 280 6956
 andrew@forestadvocate.org
www.forestadvocate.org

someone already post this link? 17.Sep.2003 23:53

boonplod

 http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?c108:3:./temp/~c108jI0W2U::

theres the link to the actual legislation as put through the house...

one thing i must remind everyone... forest fires are NEEDED FOR THE FOREST TO MAINTAIN HEALTH, trying to stop forest fires is basically the worst thing you could do for the long term health of a forest, besides of course cutting it and polluting it... there is NO potential gain from attempting to control fires. Fires help to work nutrients back into the soil, and certain types of trees seeds will not sprout until after a forest fire.. firs and such... point being, yay, im sure theres already been an overview covering that, but meh. So even though the administration is just using (forest fires) as an excuse to try and log the public lands, it is infact a horrible excuse.

press release template 18.Sep.2003 06:22

NFPA & American Lands Alliance repost

Friends:

It appears Mark Rey and the Admindustry are tying
to attach a "Healthy
Forest" logging rider to the
Interior Approps bill. We have written a press
release template on a
potential HR 1904 rider and on the findings of
the recent GAO report for you
to send out today.

Thanks for your help during this CRITICAL phase
of the campaign against the
"Healthy Forest" logging bill.

Best, Andrew George

[YOUR ORGANIZATION'S NAME AND LOGO]

For Immediate Release:
Sept. 17, 2003

Contact: Activist name, Organization, phone
number

Bush Officials Try to Slip Logging Package into Spending Bill in Order to Avoid Open Debate

Efforts to Bypass Senate Debate Come as New GAO Report Shows Forest Service and Interior Department Fail To Make Community
Fire Protection a Top Priority


Having failed to win broad support in the US Senate for their so-called "Healthy Forest Initiative," Bush Administration
officials now are trying to slip their plan into a larger spending bill in hopes of avoiding an open debate on the package.

After Senate Republicans indicated they would not bring the Bush plan to the floor because of weak support, former logging
lobbyist and Agriculture Undersecretary Mark Rey began holding backroom meetings with Senate leaders
in hopes of rolling the Bush plan into a massive funding bill for the Interior Department.

"Rey and the Bush administration are trying to circumvent the democratic process and push through their disastrous forest
logging plan without full scrutiny," said [activist name and organization.]
"I guess we shouldn't be surprised because their forest plan also would cut public citizens out of
the decision-making process for their National Forests."

[OR INSERT OWN QUOTE HERE]

The Bush plan would abolish citizens' current statutory right to appeal Forest Service hazardous fuels projects and would
exempt all projects from the existing public comment and administrative appeals process.

The Bush plan also undermines America's independent judicial process bytrying to place forest logging projects ahead of
any other pending civil or criminal case, and by attempting to instruct judges to give special weight to the government's views.

Ironically, the administration's attempt to slip its logging plan into the broader spending bill comes just as a new General
Accounting Office study reveals that opposition from citizen groups is not a significant factor in
delaying hazardous fuels projects.

Instead, the study found that weather and the diversion of Forest Service funding from fuels reduction projects to fire suppression efforts were the biggest cause of delays.

In early August, the Forest Service borrowed $400 million from non-firefighting accounts to supplement the $418 million that it already had received this year for fighting fires. Among the accounts is one that pays for thinning and burning small trees and brush in fire-prone forests.

The report, released on Sept. 15, also found that the Forest Service and the
Interior Department have failed to identify which forest areas are most at
risk of wildfire or pose the greatest fire threat to communities.

The agencies also have failed to determine how effective their fuels reduction projects are in protecting forests and communities from fire, or
how much it will cost to reduce the risks by cutting down excess trees, the GAO study found.

"The Forest Service and Interior Department can't tell us which areas are most at risk of wildfire, how much it will cost
to protect these areas, or even if their current program of removing trees has been effective," said
[ACTIVIST NAME AND ORGANIZATION]. "And yet the Bush administration wants to
push through a plan that will give these agencies waivers from environmental
laws and more money to log more trees in places where we'll have no idea if
it's doing any good."

"We here in [INSERT STATE] know what areas should be prioritized for fuel reduction projects," said [LOCAL ACTIVISTS NAME AND ORGANIZATION]. "It's around communities where lives and homes are threatened by fire.
Unfortunately, the Bush administration wants to log trees deep in National
Forests, miles away from where people live."

The Bush plan would authorize $125 million in taxpayer subsidies for logging
of trees in National Forests.

The plan, however, provides no funding to help communities protect
themselves against wildfire. All money under the plan goes to federal lands despite the fact that 85
percent of the land surrounding communities most at risk of fire is state,
private or tribal - not federal land.

The plan also cuts the heart out of the National Environmental Policy Act
even though studies show that the environmental review process does not add
significant costs or delays to fuel reduction projects.

To view the full GAO report (GAO-03-805), go to
< http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d03805.pdf>

Support Leahy/Boxer S 1453 Bill 19.Sep.2003 20:36

update

CALL-IN SCRIPT

Hello, I would like to speak with the environmental legislative assistant
(LA) about how Senator X plans to vote on the upcoming Senate vote on HR
1904.

To LA - I'm calling to urge Senator X to vote no on the Senate version of HR
1904. I'm concerned that this bill does nothing to protect rural homeowners
from wildfire. Instead it plays on the public's fear of fire to limit
citizen participation and undermine our nation's environmental laws in order
to increase logging on America's National Forests. Instead I urge the
Senator to please co-sponsor the Leahy/Boxer "Forestry and Community
Assistance Act of 2003" (S. 1453).

I specifically have 4 areas of concern with the so-called Healthy Forests
and Restoration Act of 2003 (HR 1904), this bill will:

1. Not ensure any increased protection for communities at risk from fires.
Protecting communities and lives must be the top priority for fire
legislation.

2. Focus logging in the backcountry miles away from communities at risk.

3. Take away citizens democratic right to participate in decisions about how
our public lands are managed.

4. Interfere with the Independent Judiciary by restricting the public's
democratic rights to seek redress in the court involving grievances with the
federal government for damaging logging projects.

The Senator should instead cosponsor the Leahy/Boxer "Forestry and Community
Assistance Act of 2003"(S. 1453), which:

1. Protects communities and their drinking water infrastructure by
prioritizing fuels reduction in the Community Protection Zone, directly
around communities and municipal drinking water infrastructure.

2. Funds fuels reduction work on federal as well as state, tribal, and
non-industrial private lands in the Community Protection Zone.

3. Establishes and funds watershed and forest restoration programs on
National Forests and BLM lands.

4. Protects already healthy forests such as roadless areas, old-growth, and
threatened and endangered species habitat and prohibits road construction on
these ecologically valuable lands.

How do you expect Senator X to vote? Will the Senator co-sponsor the
Leahy/Boxer Bill? If so, please contact Senator Leahy's office at
202-224-4242 in to sign on to the bill. Thank you for your time and
consideration.


SAMPLE LETTER (TO FAX OR EMAIL TO YOUR SENATORS)

Dear Senator (insert name),

Very soon the Senate will be asked to vote on legislation that recently
passed the House of Representatives entitled the "Healthy Forest Restoration
Act of 2003" (HR 1904). I urge you to oppose HR 1904. The Bush
Administration and many proponents of HR 1904 continue to dramatize last
year's fire season in an attempt to advance timber industry proposals. Like
the Bush Administration's falsely labeled "Healthy Forests Initiative," HR
1904 seeks to undermine environmental review, waive meaningful public
participation, and interfere with our independent judiciary in order to
favor big timber companies over community protection. For example, HR 1904,
in an unprecedented attempt, changes the standard of judicial review to
prevent courts from stopping harmful projects on lands managed by the Forest
Service or the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), thereby tipping the scales
of justice to favor the timber industry and wiping out over a century of
legal precedent.

There is a better way. Please co-sponsor the "Forestry and Community
Assistance Act of 2003" (S. 1453) introduced recently by Senators Leahy
(D-VT) and Boxer (D-CA). This alternative provides the necessary funding to
assist at-risk communities by thinning small diameter trees and brush in the
Community Protection Zone directly around a community's structures and their
drinking water supply systems. Instead of logging the largest, fire
resistant trees far away from communities - which, according to the
country's top forest scientists actually increases fire risk and makes fires
larger and more intense -- S. 1453 focuses fuels reduction work immediately
within this defensive Community Protection Zone. According to the Forest
Service's own research, this approach is the only proven method to protect
lives and homes and is the best use of taxpayer resources.

In addition and in contrast to HR 1904, the "Forestry and Community
Assistance Act" (S. 1453) establishes and funds watershed and forest
restoration programs without eliminating citizens' from the forest planning
process and without gutting environmental laws. S. 1453 protects forests
that are currently healthy and fire resilient such as old-growth and
roadless areas, and prohibits road construction on these ecologically
valuable lands. In summary, S. 1453 will save taxpayer dollars by
prioritizing fuels reduction work where it will actually benefit
communities, expedites fuels reduction projects directly around communities
while retaining critical environmental safeguards and laws, keeps public
lands in the public's hands, promotes and funds true watershed and forest
health restoration, and protects pristine areas from logging and road
building.

Please oppose HR 1904 and support a better approach to protecting
communities and our forests by endorsing the "Forestry and Community
Assistance Act (S. 1453). Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
[First Name] [Last Name]
[Address]
[City], [State] [Zip]


BACKGROUND ON LEAHY/BOXER BILL

Senators Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Barbara Boxer (D-CA) have introduced the
"Forestry and Community Assistance Act of 2003" (S. 1453), which is based on
the best available science on protecting homes, communities and municipal
drinking water. S. 1453 provides funding and establishes programs for truly
restoring forests and watersheds degraded by activities such as fire
suppression, logging and road building, and funds watershed restoration work
on State and Tribal lands. In direct contrast to the misnamed "Healthy
Forests Restoration Act of 2003" (HR 1904), and the Bush Administration's
so-called "Healthy Forests Initiative," the Forestry and Community
Assistance Act protects forests that are currently healthy and resilient to
fire such as roadless and old growth areas, which are threatened by logging
and roadbuilding as a result of recent Bush Administration regulatory
changes. Finally, S. 1453 does not interfere with the independent
judiciary, does not cut the public out of decisions affecting their public
forests, and does not gut the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).


TALKING POINTS ON LEAHY-BOXER BILL AND HR 1904

COMMUNITY PROTECTION:
Leahy-Boxer Bill focuses on proven methods to protect homes and communities,
is consistent with the Western Governors' Association (WGA) 10-Year
Comprehensive Strategy on Wildfire and provides vitally needed funding to
states and counties to help reduce wildfire risk where the need is greatest.

H.R. 1904 does not provide any increased protections for homes and
communities and is not consistent with the WGA strategy. The sham
definitions in H.R. 1904 do not require any fuels reduction activities to be
conducted near homes or communities at risk of wildfire.

IMPACT ON OUR INDEPENDENT JUDICIARY:
Leahy-Boxer Bill does not interfere with the independence of our federal
judiciary.

H.R. 1904 undermines a fundamental legal principal regarding injunctive
relief that has endured in our federal courts for centuries. In addition,
the bill seeks to restrict a core principle of our democracy -- the right of
Americans to seek fair and equitable redress in the courts for grievances
involving the federal government. H.R. 1904 tries to tilt the scales of
justice to favor logging proponents by attempting to force judges to side
with federal bureaucrats and deny the public injunctive relief, even for
projects the court has already found to be illegal. The bill also severely
limits the amount of time that the public, communities and states have to
file a challenge or appeal; pressures judges to issue final rulings within
100 days; and sunsets preliminary injunctions in 45 days, unless they are
affirmatively renewed by the court.

PROTECTIONS FOR CURRENTLY HEALTHY FORESTS:
Leahy-Boxer Bill properly funds fuels reduction work rather than allowing
the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to give healthy, fire
resistant trees to the timber industry as payment instead of cash. It also
protects mature and old growth forests and roadless areas, which contain the
healthiest, most fire resilient trees on National Forest and BLM lands.

H.R. 1904 gives the timber industry healthy, fire resistant trees as payment
instead of cash to carry out fuels reduction work, a mistake that can
actually increase fire risk. It also fails to protect already healthy, fire
resilient forests such as mature and old growth forests and roadless areas
from logging and road building, thereby exacerbating fire risk and
increasing future restoration costs to American taxpayers.

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW:
Leahy-Boxer Bill preserves the integrity of National Environmental Policy
Act (NEPA) for agency activities.

H.R. 1904 seeks to completely eliminate the most important part of the NEPA
- the requirement that alternatives to agency actions are considered for
projects with environmental impacts such as logging and road building. The
courts have called this consideration of alternatives the very "heart of
NEPA."

PUBLIC INPUT:
Leahy-Boxer Bill preserves Americans' rights to object to controversial
logging projects and upholds Americans' ability to participate in decisions
affecting their public forests outside the Community Protection Zone (CPZ).
Within the half-mile CPZ, non-controversial projects would be expedited and
would not be appealable, but are subject to judicial review.

H.R. 1904 seeks to repeal the Appeals Reform Act on 20 million acres of
national forest lands and gives the agency a blank slate to invent a new
process for administrative redress, without any standards or safeguards to
ensure that the new process is meaningful for the public. In fact, the only
requirements in the bill are eligibility burdens placed on the public and
not the agencies.

PROTECTIONS FOR FISH AND WILDLIFE:
Leahy-Boxer Bill establishes a healthy forest reserve program on private
lands designed to promote the recovery of threatened and endangered species,
improve biodiversity, and enhance carbon sequestration without undermining
the Endangered Species Act.

H.R. 1904 seeks to limit protections for fish and wildlife, including
threatened and endangered species, by eliminating essential NEPA processes
and creating a new program that could allow private landowners to skirt the
Endangered Species Act.

FOREST INSECTS AND DISEASE:
The Leahy-Boxer Bill authorizes $25 million per year for Land Grant
Colleges, other Universities and 1890 Institutions to carry out research on
preventing and controlling the introduction of exotic insects and diseases
that threaten forests. It further expands existing efforts to detect newly
introduced insects and diseases before they become too widespread, and
expands programs to prevent and contain introductions of exotic insects
found in U.S. ports via shipping and other pathways.

H.R. 1904 completely eliminates environmental review and excludes public
comments and participation for insect projects on federal lands.

* NFPA is also currently working with Sen. Leahy's office to safeguard communities, defend all appeal rights, and move toward a complete end to all commercial logging on federal lands.

For additional talking points and organizational materials please go to: www.forestadvocate.org or
< http://www.americanlands.org/august_organizing_packet.htm>


For more information contact: Lisa Dix, American Lands Alliance,
202-547-9105,  ldix@americanlands.org, or Andrew George, National Forest
Protection Alliance, 919-933-3073




|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
Andrew George
Campaign Coordinator
National Forest Protection Alliance
PO Box 215
Chapel Hill, NC 27514-0215
ph: 919 933 3073
cell: 828 280 6956
 andrew@forestadvocate.org
www.forestadvocate.org