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Wenesday: Speaker On IRAQ

7 PM, Weds night the 9th of July
First Congregational Church
1220 NE 68th St
Vancouver WA, 98665-0508

Joel Preston Smith, a photojournalist based in Portland, Oregon, will present a slide show titled "Living with the Enemy: A Portrait of Daily Life in Iraq." Smith's show will discuss common misperceptions of the Iraqi people, and presents a rare image of the lives of the Iraqis prior to the onset of the war. His credits include: The Irish Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Charleston Daily Mail, The Seattle Times, The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Oregonian, Willamette Week and others. His work is currently being used by two humanitarian aid agencies-Mercy Corps and Aid International. Funds from this presentation will be used to help him continue working in Iraq.
Who is this person?
Who is this person?
Joel Preston Smith, a photojournalist based in Portland, Oregon, will present a slide show titled "Living with the Enemy: A Portrait of Daily Life in Iraq." Smith's show will discuss common misperceptions of the Iraqi people, and presents a rare image of the lives of the Iraqis prior to the onset of the war. His credits include: The Irish Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Charleston Daily Mail, The Seattle Times, The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Oregonian, Willamette Week and others. His work is currently being used by two humanitarian aid agencies-Mercy Corps and Aid International. Funds from this presentation will be used to help him continue working in Iraq.

7 PM, Weds night the 9th of July


First Congregational Church
1220 NE 68th St
Vancouver WA, 98665-0508

Directions from Portland: Go North on I-5 in to Wash State. Take Exit #3 Hwy 99 toward Hazel Dell. Stay straight on to go onto WA-99 (Hwy 99) Turn Right onto NE 68th street. Go up to top of hill, church will be on your left at the hill's crest. $5 admission



 http://oregonlive.com/search/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/1054987065294900.xml?oregonian?alav,  http://mercycorps.org,  http://electroniciraq.net/news/188.shtml,  http://wweek.com/flatfiles/News3736.lasso,  http://www.iraqpeaceteam.org/pages/gallery_j-p-s/j-p-s_gallery_working1a.html,  http://www.rabble.ca/in_their_own_words.shtml?x=20046,  http://www.pictureiraq.com/jsmith/thumbs1.html,  http://oregonlive.com/search/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/1054987065294900.xml?oregonian?alav,  http://mercycorps.org,  http://electroniciraq.net/news/188.shtml,  http://wweek.com/flatfiles/News3736.lasso,  http://www.iraqpeaceteam.org/pages/gallery_j-p-s/j-p-s_gallery_working1a.html,  http://www.rabble.ca/in_their_own_words.shtml?x=20046,  http://www.pictureiraq.com/jsmith/thumbs1.html,  link to star.arabia.com.

Who is it? 08.Jul.2003 22:16

Fuzzy

I think this woman looks like an Indo-European (aryan) woman because I think she is wearing makeup which is not accepted in Iraq or fundamentalist areas. Very pretty.

ha! 09.Jul.2003 05:37

none

hey look at the white girl playing dress up!
thats real nice
too bad the people in iraq have to deal with real world stuff not dress up games

Uh huh 09.Jul.2003 09:31

tg

Yes, I keep seeing this photo and keep thinking it's a toothpaste ad, except we can't see her teeth....

das data 09.Jul.2003 22:28

Took this from the speaker

Dear Friends: Below is a summary of statistics I thought you might find useful from the above-named UNICEF report. The statistics are valuable in illustrating, concisely, the impact of the sanctions and the humanitarian implications of their maintenance over 12 years in Iraq.

Sincerely yours,

Joel Preston Smith

Portland, Oregon

The Situation of Children in Iraq

Summary, with brief explanations, of the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund report (titled as above), 2002. Compiled by Joel Preston Smith, June 2003.


Infant mortality and nutritional status of Iraqis

"Tragically, most of the children who are dying in Iraq are dying from preventable illness. Diarrhea leading to death from dehydration, and acute respiratory infections ... together account for 70 percent of child mortality in Iraq." (p. 20)

In 1999, the case fatality rate due to diarrhea in children under five years stood at 2.4 percent, while the case fatality rate for [acute respiratory illnesses] for the same age group was 1.4 percent. This is a tenfold increase over the last decade.

Infant mortality in 2002 was 107 per 1,000 live births, over double the figure for the end of the 1980s.

"The mortality rate of under-five year old children has increased by 160 percent over the last decade. This is on average ten times more than civil strife (Rwanda) or HIV/AIDS (South Africa) affected countries in east and southern Africa. De-development on such a scale is unprecedented ... ." p. 15

15.9 percent of children "suffer from being moderately to severely underweight or from general malnutrition."

22.1 percent "suffer from moderate to severe stunting or chronic malnutrition."

"In 1998, 22.8 percent of children ... suffered from malnutrition. Nearly a quarter of babies were low birth weight, indicating malnutrition in mothers."

"The immediate causes for this situation include disease and malnutrition, with preventable illnesses such as diarrhea and respiratory infections accounting for 70 percent of the mortality.... The underlying causes include the paucity of resources to rehabilitate service sectors, including health, water and sanitation, and electricity, as well as education." (p. 1)

The report states that many Iraqis live on as little as $3 to $6 (U.S. dollars) a month [a figure that, as of March 2003, was supplemented with basic foodstuffs by the Iraqi government to prevent mass starvation of the population].


55 percent of the population was living under the poverty line by 1997. (p. 12)

72 percent of average household income is spent on basic food supplies. Monthly government food rations only cover 2/3 of the month.

"[E]ven those who are employed seek second and third jobs. Teachers, whose salaries are as low as $3 a month, doctors, and civil servants seek income where they can find it, driving taxis, giving special lessons, or opening private practice." (p. 12)

Nutrition surveys carried out by UNICEF, the World Food Program and the Federal Accounting Office (U.S.) "showed that since the introduction of the Oil For Food Programme, the nutritional status of children has not improved. One in five children in the south and centre of Iraq remain so malnourished that they need special therapeutic feeding, and child sickness rates continue to be alarmingly high." (p. 11)


Impact on education

A Year 2000 study indicated that "as many as 23.7 percent of children are not attending primary school, with nearly twice as many girls staying out of school as boys ...." The report stated that the causes include dilapidated and overcrowded schools, limited number of books and supplies, lack of sanitation services. Underlying causes are poverty, attitudes toward education (the report notes that many parents point out that highly educated graduates are driving taxis) and early marriage, among other causes.

Psychosocial impacts and children

"Exhausted parents who can hardly meet the family's basic needs are naturally less sensitive and caring towards their children, and deprived children often add through their consequent difficult behavior to parents' distress. Families whose resources for loving care are depleted through long-term multiple distress can no longer provide their children with a sense of belonging, which is necessary to promote young children's curiosity, exploratory activities and tolerance for unfamiliar situations." (p. 17)

"Regarding adolescents [the report found that] 'many adolescents of both sexes suffer from malnutrition and related health problems, but also from depression as they see very little hope for their future." (p.17)

The impact of sanctions in a historical context

By 1990, 97 percent of the urban population had access to primary care. 78 percent of the rural population had access. Attendance in primary school was "about 83 percent." (p. 13)

For a brief period following the war with Iran (which ended August 1988), Iraq ranked 50th of 130 nations on the United Nations Development Program Human Development Index (which measures national achievements in health, education and per capita Gross Daily Product). By 1995, Iraq had slipped to 106th out of 174 countries. By 2000 it was at 126, "behind Bolivia, Mongolia, Egypt and Gabon...."

Regarding the decline in these development indicators, the report concluded, "The evidence points to the impact of sanctions on the population's well-being and on the national economy. By all accounts, even during the 8 years of war with Iran, the country's overall development was not dramatically affected, and the Government continued to invest heavily in social services.... As there has been no major change in government in Iraq since 1978, one can only conclude that if the Government had the resources, it would have invested in social services, as in the past. This erosion of human development ... therefore appears attributable to the lasting effects of 1990/91 including the resulting sanctions regime."

The report notes that the current rise in infant mortality, 160 percent of the 1992 figure, "is on average 10 times more than civil strife" (sic) affected countries such as Rwanda or HIV affected countries such as South Africa. (p.15)

"De-development on such a scale is unprecedented, and it will require decades of investment for the people of Iraq to reach the point at which they were in 1989.

After drawing a basic profile of these impacts on health and economic development, the report asks UN managers to review the data in the context of human rights. Specifically, the report asks managers to reference the 1993 Vienna Convention, the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women, and the Convention on the Rights of the Child organizing conferences that established specific human rights principles later adopted by the United Nations. "Given the recognition of a right to development" specified by UN principles, "the international community may wish to review the contribution of sanctions to de-development in Iraq, so as to ensure that the United Nations is not supporting a violation of the human rights of the Iraqi people, and in particular the rights of children to survival, health and education." (p. 15)

Economic Impact of the Oil For Food Program

UN Security Council Resolution (SCR) 661 imposed economic sanctions, including a full trade embargo, against Iraq in 1990. The Oil For Food Programme was established as a Memorandum of Understanding May 20, 1996.

- Tenets of the Programme:

Iraq allowed to export $2 billion in oil every 180 days "and to use the funds to procure essential humanitarian supplies." (p. 10)

30% set aside as Gulf War reparations; 13% for the three autonomous regions of the north (Kurdish areas-thus Iraq was made to fund a Kurdish insurgency); 2.2 % for UN operational costs; 1% for payments to escrow. Fifty-three percent of the revenues thus were available for domestic use in 15 governorates, totaling $1.06 billion. By comparison, Iraq's civilian imports for 1989 were $5 billion. (p. 10)


Iraq not allowed to purchase locally produced supplies, "which would have helped move the weak domestic economy." (p. 10)

In the three northern governorates, a cash component (a portion of the oil revenues returned back to local officials) was made available to pay for transportation, storage, inventory, training, installation of equipment. The southern provinces were denied a cash component.



[Joel's note: The 15 southern provinces were allowed to purchase foreign goods and supplies, but were not allowed to convert part of the revenues from the Oil For Food Programme into cash in order to pay for operating expenses for procuring, transporting, warehousing and otherwise managing the purchased goods. In other words, the Oil for Food Programme constituted an economic burden on the 15 southern provinces relative to the three northern Kurdish-dominated provinces. While the southern provinces were forced to purchase goods outside the area—thus preventing any direct economic gain through local production or manufacturing¾the northern provinces could reinvest Programme dollars locally. Also, by not providing a cash component that allowed the southern provinces to hire staff for warehousing, distribution and maintenance of facilities and goods, the programme insured that goods received would drain resources away from the Iraqi government in the southern provinces, relative to those of the north. The irony is that the programme, while on its face appearing to be a humanitarian gesture, actually contributed to the destabilization of the southern 15 provinces relative to the Kurdish-dominated provinces. Simply put, it rewarded the regions violently opposed to the Iraq government and punished those provinces firmly under Iraqi control.]

"Other weaknesses of the Oil For Food Programme stem from long delays in submissions and contract approval procedures." The 661 committee addressed the "weaknesses" of the programme by defining a "green list" of "authorized supplies."

"Nevertheless, the number of contact on hold with the 661 committee remained very high. As of 31 October 2001, contracts on hold and inoperative for the Water and Sanitation sector reached 123, worth over US$537 million." (p. 10)



*The term "programme" is used throughout this summary due to its being recorded as such in the UNICEF report.

Hey kids! 10.Jul.2003 07:38

Jan

I think this photo says, "Hey kids! If you study hard, you too can grow up to be a fedayeen!"