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imperialism & war

War support sinks in US--Blair losing his grip

Deadly attacks on coalition troops in Iraq and the slow progress of reconstruction efforts are eroding support for the US-led occupation, according to a poll released on Monday.

Only 56 per cent of respondents in the USA Today/CNN/Gallup poll said Iraq was worth going to war over, down from 73 per cent in April.
War support sinks in US

Jul 01 10:15
AFP/PA

Deadly attacks on coalition troops in Iraq and the slow progress of reconstruction efforts are eroding support for the US-led occupation, according to a poll released on Monday.

Only 56 per cent of respondents in the USA Today/CNN/Gallup poll said Iraq was worth going to war over, down from 73 per cent in April.

About 55 per cent said they were confident US-led forces would find weapons of mass destruction, down sharply from 84 per cent in late March, when the war was still raging.

Fewer than half those polled, 48 per cent, said they were confident ousted leader Saddam Hussein would be captured or killed, down from 70 per cent in March.

The poll of 1,003 adults taken at the weekend has a margin of error of three percentage points.

Meanwhile, almost two thirds of voters no longer trust Prime Minister Tony Blair, according to an opinion poll released on Monday.

And a similar number told pollsters Mori they believed Mr Blair was "losing his grip" - a view shared even by 43 per cent of Labour supporters quizzed for the survey.

The poll for the Financial Times found voters pessimistic about the government's ability to improve the economy or deliver on its key public service agenda.

Some 51 per cent of those questioned said the government's policies would not improve the economy in the long term, against 36 per cent who said they would.

Only 31 per cent of those polled were satisfied with the performance of the prime minister, against 61 per cent who were not.

Mori interviewed 1,002 adults from June 20 to 22.

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