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(Kendra James) Who will watch the police? People demand a fair process!

About 60 people met with District Attorney Mike Schrunk yesterday morning
(5/12) in regards to last week's shooting of Kendra James.
A wide range of community members and religious leaders shared concerns and made requests from the DA's office.
About 60 people met with District Attorney Mike Schrunk yesterday morning
(5/12) in regards to last week's shooting of Kendra James.
A wide range of community members and religious leaders shared concerns and made requests from
the DA's office. The most important and consistent message is about ensuring a fair and lawful process as this case goes to the Grand Jury sometime this week. We request that respected members of the community be allowed to observe the proceedings to ensure they are fair and legitimate. For far too many reasons to be named here, we cannot trust the police to police themselves. Many of us have personally witnessed incidences where
police act as though they are above the law, and they so often get away with it. Police violence against Portland's citizenry has even been repeatedly awarded (example: murder of Jose Mejia Poot) or excused (example: recent assualts at protests and elsewhere) not dealt with approriately under the laws that govern the rest of us.

We demand a legal system that is factual and fair to the victims of police violence and we demand proof of it. We are unable to have faith in a legal process based on the word of the Police Bureau alone. Since no Portland police officer has ever been indicted for a shooting in the line of duty, it will be impossible to believe that what happens behind closed doors is legitimate without a community representative that can verify the laws are upheld.
In order to begin building trust and addressessing the serious problems in the system, we seek community witnesses as the tragedy of Kendra's death is investigated. No matter what the results of the Grand Jury, we know
there is much to be done and that we must all work together in solidarity to make sure Kendra did not die in vain. This means our justice system and political leaders must support our requests for observers. It is not too much to
ask! (Although it is unfortunately not common practice, it HAS been done before).

You are invited to get involved now! Time is short! Contact City Hall
now to express your concerns and demand justice and an accountable
legal process! Phone numbers and emails are available at
www.ci.portland.or.us

Then, stay informed and involved for the long haul as our communities
work towards real accountabililty over the long term for inappropriate
police behaviors.

Portland Police are directed to protect and serve, not
shoot, pepper spray, beat and harrass! We demand change!
lethal use of force kendra 14.May.2003 04:52

corp

it is encouraging to see that the FBI civil division is getting envolved. this didn't occure in previous cases of officer involved fatal shootings where the incident was questionable.

I have whitnessed many "felony stops" it is not unusual to require the passengers to exit the vehicle from the drivers side of the car. there are two things I find highly unusual about this case one is why was there a officer in such a position that thier foot could get driven over. secondly why where the keys still in the ignition. I don't know all the facts but on the face of this there is a legitamit case against the police here. kroekers request for fbi involvment is a good sign but public pressure needs to be kept up.

the police union has too much power. officers involved in crimes do have more protection than afforded to the rest of us. namely when it come to questioning of officers by managment.

we do have a younger group of officers in that district many may not have some of the real life expriences outside of law enforcement. and need a lesson in civics, deplomicy, and patience.

NO TRUE BILL 16.May.2003 02:37

NO TRUE BILL

no true bill no true bill no true bill no true bill no true bill no true bill no true bill no true bill no true bill no true bill no true bill no true bill no true bill no true bill

Duh 16.May.2003 03:15

POPO

Hey "corp", you're going to be critical of these officers saying they don't have life experience but you obviously didn't even manage to make it through high school..."deplomicy" "whitnessed" "occure" "legitamit"??????? Learn how to spell... I'll let the rest go to poor typing.

Young black males murdered police officers at a rate almost 6 times more 22.May.2003 20:14

Policing and Homicide, 1976-98:

"Young black males murdered police officers at a rate almost 6 times that of young white males"

Highlights of the Policing and Homicide, 1976-98: Justifiable Homicide by Police, Police Officers Murdered by Felons

This report brings together in a single publication national statistics on two distinct types of homicide: the justifi­able homicide of felons by police, and the murder of police officers by felons. Although the two are fundamentally different - the use of deadly force against a police officer is almost never justified, while the use of deadly force by police often is - certain connections can be made between them beyond the fact that both always involve the police. Sometimes one directly results in the other: 1 in 6 murders of a police officer result in the justifiable killing of the murderer. (Still, of all the justifiable homicides by police only about 3% occur in connection with the murder of a police officer.) The two also share demographic similarities. For example, almost all the felons justifiably killed by police (98%) and almost all of the felons who murdered a police officer (97%) are males; in both types of homicide just over half of the felons are ages 18 to 30; and in both types just over half of the felons are white.

The first section of the report deals with the justifiable homicide of felons by police; the second, with the murder of police officers by felons. Together, the two types account for around 2% of all intentional killings in the United States. The types of homicide not covered in this report are: negligent homicides; justifiable homicides by private citizens; and murders in which the victim is someone other than an officer slain in the line of duty.

Justifiable homicide by police, 1976-98
In this report, killings by police are referred to as "justifiable homicides," and the persons that police kill are referred to as "felons." These terms reflect the view of the police agencies that provide the data used in this report.

The killing of a felon by police is consid­ered justified when it is done to prevent imminent death or serious bodily injury to the officer or another person. Police justifiably kill on average nearly 400 felons each year (the figure below and figure 1).

The first section of the report deals with the justifiable homicide of felons by police; the second, with the murder of police officers by felons. Together, the two types account for around 2% of all intentional killings in the United States. The types of homicide not covered in this report are: negligent homicides; justifiable homicides by private citizens; and murders in which the victim is someone other than an officer slain in the line of duty.

Justifiable homicide by police, 1976-98
In this report, killings by police are referred to as "justifiable homicides," and the persons that police kill are referred to as "felons." These terms reflect the view of the police agencies that provide the data used in this report.

The killing of a felon by police is consid­ered justified when it is done to prevent imminent death or serious bodily injury to the officer or another person. Police justifiably kill on average nearly 400 felons each year (the figure below and figure 1).

From 1976 to 1998, the U.S. population age 13 or older grew by about 47 million people and the size of the police force in the United States grew by over 200,000 officers, but the number of felons justifiably killed by police did not generally rise. A growing percentage of felons killed by police are white, and a declining percentage are black (figure 4)
Felons justifiably killed by police represent a tiny fraction of the total popula­tion. Of the 183 million whites in 1998, police killed 225; of the 27 million blacks, police killed 127. While the rate (per million population) at which blacks were killed by police in 1998 was about 4 times that of whites (the figure below and figure 5), the difference used to be much wider: the black rate in 1978 was 8 times the white rate.
The highest rates of justifiable homicide are of young black males. Of the Nation's 3.4 million young black males (black males under age 25) in 1998, 48 were justifiably killed by police. That year, young black males made up 1 % of the total U.S. population but 14% of felons justifiably killed by police. By comparison, of the Nation's 18.3 million young white males, 53 were justifiably killed. Young white males were 7% of the population and 15% of those killed in 1998.
Of all the felons justifiably killed by police from 1976 to 1998, 53% were ages 18 to 30, and 98% were males. According to the latest statistics (1998), white officers are 87% of the Nation's police force and account for 82% of justifiable homicides by police. Black officers make up 11 % of the Nation's police and account for 17% of the justifi­able homicides (figure 10).
Police Officers murdered by felons, 1976-98

Since 1976, an average of 79 police officers have been murdered each year in the line of duty (figure 12). The number of officers murdered each year is dropping, and the rate at which police officers are being murdered is steadily falling (the figure below and figure 14).

In 1978, 1 in 4,000 police officers were murdered; in 1988, 1 in 6,000; and in 1998, 1 in 11,000 officers (figure 14).

Throughout much of the 1990's, white police officers made up about 87% of all police officers in the United States and 83% of all officers murdered by felons. Black officers were 11 % of police officers but 15% of those murdered. Officers of other races were 2% of police officers and 2% of those murdered (figure 15).

On average, officers murdered from 1976 to 1998 had 9 years of law enforcement service.

From 1976 to 1998, two-thirds of the felons who murdered a police officer had a prior criminal arrest (figure 16). The majority of police officers murdered by felons were killed while responding to disturbance calls (16%) or arrest situations (39%).

Firearms claimed the lives of 92% of the officers killed in the line of duty from 1976 to 1998. The officer's own gun was used in 12% of all murders of police officers.

Murderers of police officers represent a tiny fraction of the total population.

Of the Nation's 18.3 million young white males (white males under age 25),

17 murdered a police officer in 11998. Of the 3.4 million young black males, 13 murdered an officer that year.

From 1980 to 1998, young black males made up about 1 % of the U.S. popula­tion but 21 % of felons who murdered a police officer (figure 17); young white males were 8% of the population but 20% of the murderers of law enforce­ment officers. Young black males murdered police officers at a rate almost 6 times that of young white males (5.7 versus 1 per million popula­tion) (the figure below and figure 18).

 http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/ph98.pdf