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US TROOPS MASSACRE 15 IRAQI PROTESTORS

more democracy and freedom, american style. the liberation rages on....
 http://www.guardian.co.uk/Iraq/Story/0,2763,945719,00.htmlThe Guardian UK

US troops 'kill 15 Iraqi protesters'

Sarah Left and agencies
Tuesday April 29, 2003

US troops opened fire on a group of Iraqi demonstrators near Baghdad yesterday, killing around 15 people and wounding 50 others, according to reports from the area.

Qatar's al-Jazeera television station reported that troops had fired on the demonstrators in the town of Falluja, around 30 miles west of Baghdad, after someone in the crowd threw a stone at US soldiers. The protesters had been demonstrating against the continued US presence in Iraq, al-Jazeera said.

US central command in Qatar said that it had no information about the incident.

A correspondent for the Reuters news agency in Falluja said residents put the death toll at between 13 and 17 people. Witnesses said that the demonstrators, who had been protesting at a school, had not been armed. They said that the protest had been peaceful.

A local Sunni Muslim cleric, Kamal Shaker Mahmoud, told Reuters that the demonstrators had gone to a school occupied by US troops to ask them to leave.

"They were asking the Americans to leave the school so they could use it," he said. "They opened fire on the protesters because they went out to demonstrate. We are asking the Americans to completely leave Iraq, but first we want them to leave residential areas."

An al-Jazeera reporter in Baghdad said that the injured were being treated at five hospitals around Falluja. The Reuters correspondent witnessed six burials.

Elsewhere in Iraq, US central command today said that Saddam Hussein's former oil minister had surrendered to coalition forces.

Amer Mohammed Rashid, known to UN weapons inspectors as the "Missile Man", turned himself in yesterday. A former general with expertise in weapons delivery systems, he was ranked 47th on the US military's list of the 55 most-wanted officials from Saddam's regime.

Mr Rashid is married to Rihab Taha, the microbiologist known as "Dr Germ" who was in charge of the secret Iraqi facility that weaponised anthrax and other toxic substances. US forces raided her house in Baghdad last month, but there was no word on her whereabouts.

 http://www.guardian.co.uk/Iraq/Story/0,2763,945719,00.html

homepage: homepage: http://www.guardian.co.uk/Iraq/Story/0,2763,945719,00.html

Bull 29.Apr.2003 05:19

Hillary C.

Sounds like a load of crap!!!

Update 29.Apr.2003 05:26

RePost

The Guardian has updated its report. Its 13 not 15 killed. Watch to see how and if the American Media reports this issue. My guess is they will try to justify the massacre with the alibi that 1). The US troops were threatened somehow with "mysterious shots" fired 2). The mythical "Saddam Loyalists" will be blamed. 3). Ignore it completely. Massacre? What massacre? Democracy and Freedom are in full bloom in Iraq!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
US troops 'kill 13 Iraqi protesters'

Sarah Left and agencies
Tuesday April 29, 2003

US troops opened fire on a group of Iraqi demonstrators near Baghdad yesterday, killing at least 13 people and wounding 75 others, according to reports from the area.
Qatar's al-Jazeera television station reported that troops had fired on the demonstrators in the town of Falluja, around 30 miles west of Baghdad, after someone in the crowd threw a stone at US soldiers. The protesters had been demonstrating against the continued US presence in Iraq, al-Jazeera said.

US central command in Qatar said troops had shot at armed Iraqis who had fired on the soldiers. Witnesses said that the demonstrators, who had been protesting at a local school, had not been armed. They said that the protest had been peaceful.

A correspondent for the Reuters news agency in Falluja said that residents put the death toll at between 13 and 17 people. The director of the main hospital in Falluja said 13 people had died and said his staff and treated another 75 people.

A local Sunni Muslim cleric, Kamal Shaker Mahmoud, told Reuters that the demonstrators had gone to a school occupied by US troops to ask them to leave.

"They were asking the Americans to leave the school so they could use it," he said. "They opened fire on the protesters because they went out to demonstrate. We are asking the Americans to completely leave Iraq, but first we want them to leave residential areas."

An al-Jazeera reporter in Baghdad said that the injured were being treated at five hospitals around Falluja. The Reuters correspondent witnessed six burials.

Elsewhere in Iraq, US central command today said that Saddam Hussein's former oil minister had surrendered to coalition forces.

Amer Mohammed Rashid, known to UN weapons inspectors as the "Missile Man", turned himself in yesterday. A former general with expertise in weapons delivery systems, he was ranked 47th on the US military's list of the 55 most-wanted officials from Saddam's regime.

Mr Rashid is married to Rihab Taha, the microbiologist known as "Dr Germ" who was in charge of the secret Iraqi facility that weaponised anthrax and other toxic substances. US forces raided her house in Baghdad last month, but there was no word on her whereabouts.

hard to justify 29.Apr.2003 07:47

I. Protest

"My guess is they will try to justify the massacre with the alibi that 1). The US troops were threatened somehow with "mysterious shots" fired"

Sure, they've done that at least twice with incidents like this in Mosul, and they laid it on so thick that anyone who wasn't comatose could see through it. They will spin anything they get their hands on including that incident with a young girl and a bomblet, which one journalist after another has called an accident but of course the military tried to turn into a deliberate attack. Even some of lap-dog media is stating to use words like "alledgedly" and "reportedly" in their very headlines concerning military-filtered info on Iraq.

The other day they apparently blew up ammo without warning the civilians to stay clear, and it somehow quickly mututated into a story that some militant enemy fired on U.S. troops and detonated the ammo.

If they don't get some rubber bullets over there right quick, I'm going to sit here thinking they simply downsized their "turkey-shoots" and moved them to the civilian sector, and that it's probably mostly Chalabi's goons that are sniping at our troops to help out the "justification"...

Is this picture of "democracy" as soldiers sniping cilvilians in Iraq, the on-going vision / sick fantasy of the powers-that-be, as to what democracy in America should look like?

They will twist these recurring events every which way, but what decent, self-respecting American wants to aid and abet by swallowing it hook line and sinker?

How can they EVER begin to really justify using lethal force for civilian crowd dispersal, regardless of what lies they package it in?

"self-defense" 29.Apr.2003 09:11

edsel

The media are now reporting that it was "self-defense". What a load.

More Civilians Murdered by US 29.Apr.2003 10:18

Lars the Infidel

A couple weeks ago, US troops mowed down at least 12 Iraqi demonstrators in Mosul protesting at the City Hall building.

And now this.

More is sure to come.

This is what Democracy Looks Like?!

US Killers out of IRAQ!!

NY TImes 29.Apr.2003 13:30

repost

Iraqis Said to Be Killed as U.S. Forces Fire on Protest
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Filed at 4:17 p.m. ET

FALLUJAH, Iraq (AP) -- U.S. soldiers opened fire on Iraqis at a nighttime demonstration after people shot at them with automatic rifles, soldiers said Tuesday. The director of the local hospital said 13 Iraqis were killed and 75 wounded.

U.S. officials could not confirm any deaths but said at least seven armed Iraqis were wounded.

Iraqis interviewed at a hospital said U.S. soldiers opened fire without warning about 10:30 p.m. Monday at a peaceful demonstration against the U.S. presence in this town some 50 kilometers (30 miles) west of Baghdad. They said none of the Iraqis was armed or throwing rocks, and that the shooting lasted about 30 minutes.

Soldiers at the scene said many in the crowd had AK-47 assault rifles and were firing into the air -- a common practice at boisterous events. But the soldiers said they opened fire only after shots were fired at a school in which they were headquartered.

Also Tuesday, U.S. officials announced that Amer Mohammed Rashid, who once headed Iraq's top-secret missile program and later served as oil minister, had surrendered. In southern Basra province, the governor -- a member of Saddam's clan -- turned himself in, the exile Iraqi National Congress said.

The incident in Fallujah -- a predominantly Sunni Muslim area that provided strong support for Saddam Hussein's Baath Party -- was the third reported fatal shooting involving U.S. troops and Iraqi protesters in the past two weeks, underscoring the problems facing soldiers whose training focuses more on combat operations than crowd control.

The shootings, widely reported by Arab news media, have served to fuel growing resentment of the U.S. military presence in Iraq only weeks after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein's regime.

U.S. Central Command said in a statement that paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division were fired upon Monday night by about 25 armed civilians mixed within an estimated crowd of 200 protesters outside a compound they were occupying.

``The paratroopers, who received fire from elements mixed within the crowd and positioned atop neighboring buildings, returned fire, wounding at least seven of the armed individuals,'' the statement said.

The 82nd Airborne Division has one battalion spread out around Fallujah, and a company of 150 was inside a school that serves as its headquarters when the shooting took place, soldiers said.

``We saw three guys on the roof firing into the (school) building,'' said Sgt. Nkosi Campbell, pointing at the house across the street from the school. ``Everybody could see the muzzle flashes.''

Saying his troops acted with restraint, he said his men were worried about the rules of engagement -- whether they should open fire.

``They turned around and said, `Hey, Sergeant, can we shoot?''' Campbell said. ``That was when they were already receiving fire.''

Col. Arnold Bray of the 82nd Airborne Division said there were infiltrators in the crowd, including some who were armed and on nearby rooftops. ``Which kind of schoolboys carry AK-47s?'' Bray asked.

But at the hospital, a wounded 18-year-old man, Aqil Khaleil, said U.S. soldiers opened fire with no warning.

``They waited until we came very close, and then they started shooting,'' he said.

Dr. Ahmed Ghanim al-Ali, director of Fallujah General Hospital, said there were 13 dead, including three boys no older than 10. He said his medical crews were shot at when they went to retrieve the wounded, which he said numbered 75 people.

One resident said 15 were killed.

Central Command said that because the crowd retrieved the wounded and dispersed after the exchange, ``it is extremely unlikely that the coalition will ever be able to confirm casualties, or determine the extent to which any unarmed civilians were injured or killed.''

Al-Jazeera showed four coffins at a funeral in the town Tuesday.

Air Force Maj. Gen. Gene Renuart, U.S. Central Command's operations director, said the demonstration was apparently in celebration of Saddam's birthday.

Townspeople, however, gave different accounts.

Some said the crowd was objecting to the presence in Fallujah of troops from the 82nd Airborne's 1st Battalion, 325 Regiment. Others said the protest was held by students aged 5 to 20 to ask the soldiers to leave the school where they were staying so classes could resume Tuesday as scheduled.

Edtesam Shamsudeim, 37, who lives nearby, said her 45-year-old brother died in the gunfire. She was shot in the leg; her husband was wounded.

``We were sitting in our house. When the shooting started, my husband tried to close the door to keep the children in, and he was shot,'' she said at the hospital, sitting in a chair with a bandaged leg, surrounded by some of her children. Their clothes were stained with bloody handprints.

``Americans are criminals,'' she said.

Monday's demonstration was the first organized protest against the Americans in Fallujah, although one soldier was slightly injured recently when a flare was fired toward some troops, according to Lt. Col. Eric Nantz.

Residents say they had been growing increasingly disturbed by the presence of U.S. forces.

Outside the school Tuesday afternoon, people chanted for U.S. forces to leave Iraq. ``Go, go USA!'' they shouted in Arabic, adding some English at the end: ``Go away!''

``It's important to sort out the facts of what happened,'' White House spokesman Ari Fleischer said. ``American forces, wherever they are, have the right to defend themselves and they will do so with the utmost care and professionalism.''

There were two earlier reported fatal shootings involving U.S. troops and Iraqi protesters in the past two weeks. Marines opened fire during angry demonstrations April 15-16 in the northern city of Mosul. Iraqis said 10 people were killed in the two incidents. Marines insisted they only fired at people who shot at them.