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SARS flares up in China: 18 more deaths, 339 infected

"Experience has shown that when these cases are promptly detected, isolated, and managed... further spread to hospital staff and family members either does not occur at all or results in a very small number of secondary infections." But the WHO also said it was concerned about the outbreaks in Hong Kong and Canada.
SARS flares up in China: 18 more deaths, 339 infected
Central Chronicle, India, April 21 2003

BEIJING: China sacked its health minister and Beijing's mayor on Sunday after reporting a huge increase in SARS deaths and cases in the capital, a tacit admission that officials had earlier hidden the extent of the problem. Authorities said the SARS virus had killed at least 18 more people and infected 339 in addition to the 402 suspected cases, almost all in the capital.

Within an hour of announcing the new figures, the official Xinhua news agency carried a terse one-paragraph report saying Health Minister Zhang Wenkang and Beijing Deputy Party boss Meng Xuenong, the city mayor, had been sacked. No reason was given. "There was no other way," said a source with close ties to government leaders. "The situation in Beijing got totally out of control and someone had to be held accountable."

The sacking was intended to put provincial leaders on notice that there should be no effort to cover up the spread of the disease, and to the world that China was serious about curbing the SARS outbreak, analysts said.

China's Vice Health Minister Gao Qiang, the top health official after his boss was sacked, blamed the surge in cases on a healthcare system ill-prepared to handle a sudden outbreak such as SARS, which emerged in Guangdong in November and has been spread around the world by air travellers since February. He also said that the weeklong May Day holiday was being cancelled to discourage travel.

"The purpose of such an act is to avoid the flow of massive numbers of people, which potentially could lead to the spread of this epidemic," he said. "I'm sure this measure will mean major losses for tourism revenues. However, people's lives and people's health have to be put above everything else," Gao said.

In Hong Kong, authorities said seven more people had died and 22 more were infected, taking the toll in the city to 88, the highest in the world. Singapore closed down one of the city-state's largest vegetable markets after three workers there were infected.

The World Health Organisation said the threat of a global SARS pandemic was receding. "The vast majority of countries reporting probable SARS cases are dealing with a small number of imported cases," the WHO said in an update on its Website at  http://www.who.int

"Experience has shown that when these cases are promptly detected, isolated, and managed... further spread to hospital staff and family members either does not occur at all or results in a very small number of secondary infections," it said.

But the WHO said it was concerned about the outbreaks in Hong Kong and Canada. It said a large and sudden cluster of almost simultaneous cases seen in residents of a Hong Kong housing estate had raised the possibility of transmission from an environmental source.

It said the disease appeared to be more severe both in residents of the estate and in related cases among hospital staff. It could be that those patients had exceptionally high levels of virus in their bodies, it said, or the virus, which belongs to the coronavirus family, may have mutated.

In Canada, the WHO worried about an outbreak among 31 people including members of a religious group, their relatives and healthcare workers who treated them.


Suspected case in Mumbai

MUMBAI: A suspected SARS case has been reported in the city and the person, who came from Bangkok on Saturday night, has been admitted to hospital.

The person was suffering from hypertension and showed high blood pressure and slight breathlessness, Kasturba Gandhi Hospital sources said here on Sunday.

"However, he does not have high fever," they said.

He was admitted to hospital as he spent long hours in Hong Kong and boarded the flight from Bangkok to India, the sources said.

The person is comfortable and fine, doctors said, adding he wanted to go home but the hospital authorities were awaiting the test confirmation for any suspected SARS.

So far, 12 suspected cases of SARS have been reported from different parts of the country, of which ten turned out to be negative. - Agencies

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SARS IS AN ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL WEAPON 20.Apr.2003 20:20

Sars Scam


A depopulation scheme like so-called AIDS 21.Apr.2003 07:44

open mind

There's always a target undesirable group who are named as the proliferators, a so-called high risk group, of a deadly "infectious" disease. With so-called AIDS it started out with Gays and iv drug users, then Haitians, then prisoners, then subSaharan Africans and now African Americans between the childbearing ages of 18-44 (hmmmm.) The only reason why Hatians were removed from the AIDS list is because they saw through all b.s., got organized, and fought like mad against the lies and stigmatization.

By the way, with respect to AIDS in subsaharan Africa, is anybody at all suspicious of how a supposedly rapidly-spreading infectious disease can remain in only one part of the continent and not have spread up to the North by now?

Now the Far East is giving us problems so they get their own disease-- so-called SARS. I take it that since China won't be much of a team player in the imperialsm game, they earned the title "high risk group", much like Blacks and Gays with so-called AIDS.

There's a chart somewhere showing how the rise in new "infectious" diseases are directly proportional to the amount of surplus labor in the world. When there's a surplus of jobs and shortage of working class people (laborers), we're all healthy, no new viruses. Conversely, when working class people vastly outnumber the amount of demeaning, mind-numbing jobs in the world, it's time for a new "epidemic", and a new drug to help "wipe out" the so-called epidemic (or wipe out the undesirable surplus labor, whichever comes first).