portland independent media center  
images audio video
newswire article portland metro

arts and culture | human & civil rights

Black History Month Events at Reed College

Black History Month events at Reed College include 3 speakers and one poet in Kaul auditorium and an art exhibition Feb 1-16th in Vollum lounge, including a slide show on the 11th.
BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION!

AT REED COLLEGE
(3203 SE Woodstock cr/str. 30th)

Events include lectures, readings, and an art exhibition

Reed College will celebrate Black History Month in February with four notable visitors: Randall Robinson, internationally respected advocate for human rights and democracy; renowned sociologist Orlando Patterson; poet, playwright, and activist Sonia Sanchez; and noted Portland artist Isaka Shamsud-Din. Events include lectures, readings, and an art exhibition (see schedule below for details). All events are free and open to the public; for information see  http://web.reed.edu/publicevents or call the Reed events
line at 503/777-7755.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

FEBRUARY 1-16, VOLLUM LOUNGE ART EXHIBITION: ISAKA SHAMSUD-DIN

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 4:30 P.M., VOLLUM LOUNGE SLIDE LECTURE: ISAKA SHAMSUD-DIN
Isaka Shamsud-Din, the first James DePreist Professor of art at Portland State University, is a lifelong Portland artist whose work appears in the Portland Art Museum and in many collections (including that of Reed College) around the region. Shamsud-Din's ties to PSU reach back to the 1960s, when he was president of the Black Student Union and later worked to introduce scholarship opportunities for minority students. Though he left Portland to be involved in the civil rights movement in the South and work in the San Francisco area, Shamsud-Din found himself in Portland again in the 1980s. He then involved himself in mural projects at local high schools and government buildings in an attempt to create a self-perpetuating sense of community among African American artists. He hopes to continue these efforts and more in his new position.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 7:30 P.M., KAUL AUDITORIUM LECTURE: RANDALL ROBINSON ON SLAVERY REPARATIONS
Randall Robinson is author of The Debt: What America Owes to Blacks; The Reckoning: What Blacks Owe to Each Other; and Defending the Spirit: A Black Life in America. A past president of TransAfrica and TransAfrica Forum, Robinson is widely recognized for his leadership of the Free South Africa Movement (which pushed successfully for the imposition of comprehensive economic sanctions to end apartheid in South Africa), his efforts to highlight the effect of globalization on Africa and the Caribbean, his work to win support for reparations for African Americans, and his efforts to alert Americans to the causes and implication of America's burgeoning prison industrial complex. Robinson has worked as assistant to Congressman Charles Diggs and Congressman William Clay, was a Ford Foundation Fellow, and holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School. Sponsored by Reed's Multicultural Enrichment Committee.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 7:30 P.M., KAUL AUDITORIUM LECTURE: ORLANDO PATTERSON, "THE CONSEQUENCES OF SLAVERY FOR THE AFRO-AMERICAN PRESENT"
Orlando Patterson is John Cowles Professor of Sociology at Harvard University. His research into historical and contemporary America, with special emphasis on the intersecting problems of race, immigration, and multiculturalism, has distinguished him as one of the nation's leading authorities on slavery and its legacies. His books include Slavery and Social Death, Rituals of Blood: The Consequences of Slavery in Two American Centuries, and Freedom: Freedom in the Making of Western Culture, for which he won the National Book Award. Recipient of the Ralph Bunche Sociological Award of the American Political Science Association for the best scholarly work on pluralism, Patterson is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the author of three novels, a number of anthologized short stories, and numerous reviews and critical essays that appear regularly in the New York Times, Newsweek, and the New Republic. Sponsored by Reed's Multicultural Enrichment Committee with support from the Reed sociology, anthropology, and political science departments; the Charles McKinley Fund; and the R.H. and B.D. Ellis sociology lecture fund.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 7:30 P.M., KAUL AUDITORIUM POETRY READING AND BOOK SIGNING: SONIA SANCHEZ
Sonia Sanchez is the author of over 16 books including Homecoming, We a BaddDDD People, Homegirls and Handgrenades, Wounded in the House of a Friend, and most recently Shake Loose My Skin. Her honors include a National Endowment for the Arts grant, an American Book Award, a Pew Fellowship, the Langston Hughes Poetry Award, and the 2001Frost Medal for Distinguished Achievement from the Poetry Society of America. A founding member of the "Broadside Quartet," Sanchez is also known for her involvement in the civil rights movement and later in the black arts movement. She has lectured and has read her poetry widely nationally and internationally. Sponsored by Reed's Multicultural Enrichment Committee with support from Reed Arts Week (RAW), Reed's division of literature and languages, and the Reed visiting writers series.
ever wonder 02.Feb.2003 20:14

Mehgun

Do you ever wonder why Black History Month is the shortest month of the year?

it should seem even shorter 03.Feb.2003 06:14

strange days..or not

february should seem even shorter with an increase of strange stuff being reported to provide cover for GWB and "." and "Bush Admirer". at least they'll be keeping busy, ain't that right BA, . ?

reed students hear me 05.Feb.2003 20:28

Efeni

maybe if you had had a proper WHITE history class you priveledged bunch that can afford to get into reed would have thought way more than twice about continuing the gap and increasing the institutionalized racism that has ohhhhh fuck it's bad. You could have used your tuition money to help the oppressed people more than attending some lecture on black people you will never live amongst. Drop out suckers live with and for the people. come to the northeast and organize a self education is the best any way. Better than some punk yapping about freud. The language you learn as a reed intelectual is racist it does not reach the people. REVOLUTION for and by all