portland independent media center  
images audio video
newswire article

Ari Admits Bush Lied

Last week pResident Bush said he "read" the a 268-page federal report that blamed global warming on oil refineries, cars and people, now Ari Fleischer admits he didn't.
Breath of Fresh Air Open mouth. Insert loafer.

In a stunning (well, really, is it?) admission, chief White House flack Ari Fleischer 'fessed up yesterday: President Bush didn't actually read a 268-page federal report that blamed global warming on oil refineries, cars and people.

Still, his boss dissed the report last week.

"I read the report put out by the bureaucracy," Bush said, before reiterating his opposition to the international Kyoto treaty on global warming that the U.S. refuses to sign.

"Whenever Presidents say they read it, you can read that to be he was briefed," Fleischer answered when asked if Bush had read the report.

Then he suddenly realized that, perhaps, he had been just a tad too frank and open.

"I've enjoyed working here, thank you," he told the White House gaggle of reporters to hoots of laughter.

homepage: homepage: http://www.nydailynews.com/today/News_and_Views/Daily_Dish/a-153929.asp

another link 11.Jun.2002 20:14

repost

Fleischer: Bush Didn't Read Report
Tuesday June 11, 2002 2:20 AM


WASHINGTON (AP) - White House press secretary Ari Fleischer fessed up: President Bush didn't actually read that 268-page Environmental Protection Agency report on climate change, even if he said he did.

The president's spokesman then joked that his frankness might cost him his job.

``I've enjoyed working here, thank you,'' Fleischer said.

Fleischer was asked Monday at his daily White House briefing about Bush's comments that he'd read the report.

``Whenever presidents say they read it, you can read that to be he was briefed,'' Fleischer said, producing laughter.

The EPA report, submitted to the United Nations, was the first by the Bush administration to mostly blame human activity for global warming - even while acknowledging some lingering scientific uncertainties.

The White House favors a response to global warming that relies on increased spending on science and technology and on voluntary, not mandatory, measures to slow the rate of growth in gas emissions.

When Bush was asked about it last week, he dismissively remarked: ``I read the report put out by the bureaucracy.''