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imperialism & war

Norman Solomon on the Struggle (1976)

The tense passes from past to present, as we grow in ourselves, from third to first person. There must be warfare against the ventriloquists behind us, even as we feel their tongues moving sometimes in our mouths; we must not rip out our own tongue, even as we struggle for its freedom, and ours.
CHAPTER 40

Where the blood came from and went to: that was the heart of the matter, of life. It would be impossible for there to be liberation while corporations and government continued their hegemonious duet like rows of hard-core smack freaks force-feeding downers to the citizenry as they all staggered across stages in pseudo-dance; and yet people could not wait for the empire to fall, it was a joint process of creation and destruction like echoes of 19th Century anarchists, and the high would have to carry everyone through, starting now. Gosper, in all possible humility yet with unashamed and intentional conceptions of grandeur, could envision millions of sisters and brothers smashing the state like a tremendous thunderclap which would take many years, and he sensed many others met and unmet who envisioned similar scenes, each one knowing somewhere, where the blood pumped and gurgled and grew hot and warm, it was possible and they were part of it, and that was enough, that had to be enough, that had to be everything. There was no hope without sorrow, and neither without anger; we could now do little about Auschwitz or Hiroshima, but we knew more about Vietnam and Chile and Attica, and impending repetitions; the country whose streets we walked had open sewers like ripped blood veins; our bodies and minds were savagely attacked, and the only hope was in fusing the disembodiment and exploding like the humans we knew we could be. The tense passes from past to present, as we grow in ourselves, from third to first person. There must be warfare against the ventriloquists behind us, even as we feel their tongues moving sometimes in our mouths; we must not rip out our own tongue, even as we struggle for its freedom, and ours.
Even as all is done and said, nuances noted flashes abounding, wherever we live is part of the world nothing more nothing less; people come and go, as they feel they need to. We were born into an inconceivably monstrous time and place, stillborn till we begin finally to kick and laugh and scream, and even as all humankind is of one flesh—-after either all the bibles are burned or combined, ashes and unities part of all we need to face—-we here in the USA have some special responsibilities, as such a word comes into its own and we come into ours.

-- "NOW / A Narrative Document" by Norman Solomon, 1976