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Timber Sale Auction Draws Protests-- Convicted Timber thieves buy Borg TS

The Borg timber sale would clearcut 45 acres and thin an additional 15
acres of publicly owned ancient forest in the Oak Grove Watershed. The
proposal involves new roading and road reconstruction. The sale is one of many
targeting the Oak Grove Fork of the Clackamas River which, like Eagle
Creek, provides drinking water for 185,000 Oregonians. The Forest Service's
goal with the Borg and other Oak Grove sales is to convert the areašs native
and ancient forests into even-aged young tree farms.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 5/29/01

Contact:
Ivan Maluski, Cascadia Forest Alliance, 503-320-5361 or 503-239-8930

Estacada, OR: At 8:45 this morning, about a dozen activists with the
Cascadia Forest Alliance and other groups protested the auction of the
Borg timber sale in the Mt. Hood National Forest. Chanting "If you buy Borg,
you buy us!" and "Public lands, not private profit!" the activists were
hoping to deter any would-be purchasers from signing a contract with the
Forest to clearcut the 45 acres of ancient forest at stake at the Borg timber
sale.

The only purchaser to show up for the 'auction,' Thomas Creek Lumber &
Log Company, purchased the rights to cut the Borg timber sale for the
minimum bid price. Activists angrily pointed out that Thomas Creek Lumber has
been convicted of national forest timber theft in 1975 and 1991, stealing
millions of dollars of trees from the American public.

"It's already a crime that our publicly owned ancient forests and
drinking watersheds are logged at taxpayer expense every year," said Ivan
Maluski of the Cascadia Forest Alliance. "And it adds insult to injury when
convicted timber thieves are allowed to continue to log our public lands."

The Borg timber sale would clearcut 45 acres and thin an additional 15
acres of publicly owned ancient forest in the Oak Grove Watershed. The
proposal involves new roading and road reconstruction. The sale is one of many
targeting the Oak Grove Fork of the Clackamas River which, like Eagle
Creek, provides drinking water for 185,000 Oregonians. The Forest Service's
goal with the Borg and other Oak Grove sales is to convert the areašs native
and ancient forests into even-aged young tree farms. The Borg auction is
the second auction of ancient trees on public land this spring and many
more are expected this summer in the Mt. Hood National Forest. Thomas Creek also
recently purchased the contract to the Barstool timber sale and are
expected to keep bidding on Mt. Hood timber sales through the summer.

"We cannot stand by as the Forest Service continually gives away our
publicly owned ancient forests for questionable short term economic
gain," said Ivan Maluski with the Cascadia Forest Alliance, a group with a
long history of successful protest within the Clackamas Ranger District.
"Drinking water, quality wildlife habitat, intact forests and protected
public lands are the legacy we should leave our children, not this
continual cycle of more logging and roadbuilding that the Forest Service leaves
us to clean up after."

homepage: homepage: http://www.cascadiaforestalliance.org
phone: phone: 503-239-8930