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The CIA and the ‘New Afghanistan’

Even as stock market manipulators were making millions of the short-selling of stock of those firms that would hit hardest on 9-11 (manipulators some said were working within the CIA itself), what appeared to be an isolated event took place in the northern mountains of Afghanistan. Ahmed Shah Massoud, leader of the Northern Alliance, was assassinated. It would prove to be a pivotal event in the secret agenda to take over Afghanistan and install a "US-friendly" government that would expedite the Unocal-Enron oil pipeline project.
The CIA and the 'New Afghanistan'
© 2002 by Jim Moore, from the forthcoming book "Big Oil - Big War: The true story of September 11, 2001 and the 'War on Terror' - Writer's Club Press: San Jose, New York, Lincoln, Shanghai.
Even as stock market manipulators were making millions of the short-selling of stock of those firms that would hit hardest on 9-11 (manipulators some said were working within the CIA itself), what appeared to be an isolated event took place in the northern mountains of Afghanistan. Ahmed Shah Massoud, leader of the Northern Alliance, was assassinated. It would prove to be a pivotal event in the secret agenda to take over Afghanistan and install a "US-friendly" government that would expedite the Unocal-Enron oil pipeline project.
"The timing and circumstances of the attack on [Afghanistan's Northern Alliance leader] Ahmed Shah Massoud, which came just two days before the strike on the United States, do not appear to be coincidental," Jon Lee Anderson writes in "A Lion's Death." As it happens, Anderson was meeting with Massoud's brother, Wali, when news of his brother's death reached him. "Anyone who knew that the United States was going to be attacked and that Osama bin Laden and the Taliban would be blamed would also," Anderson writes, "have known that Massoud would suddenly become an important ally for the West." The Massoud assassination may have been a pre-emptive attack and part of a larger plot, Anderson reports. (The New Yorker, 1 Oct. 2001)
Massoud, while not particularly unfriendly to the West, was nevertheless a proud and stubborn man who did not want either US help or interference.

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