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COMMENTS NEEDED: HELP STOP OLD GROWTH LOGGING ON UMPQUA NATIONAL FOREST

Lemolo Old Growth Sale (Umpqua Nat'l Forest) comments are due by November 26th. Write to Diamond Lake District Ranger John Ouimet at  jouimet@fs.fed.us (please include your street address on email comments), call in comments
at 541-498-2531 or fax comments to 541-498-2515. Postal mail address is 2020 Toketee Ranger Station Road, Idleyld Park, Oregon, 97447 (please put a return address outside postal mail envelopes).
TO: All Activists
FR: Francis Eatherington, Umpqua Watersheds and George Sexton, American Lands
DATE: November 14, 2001

COMMENTS NEEDED: HELP STOP OLD GROWTH AND ROADLESS AREA LOGGING ON THE UMPQUA NATIONAL FOREST

The Umpqua National Forest is inviting you to comment (through November 26) on the dreaded Lemolo Timber Sale environmental impacts (EIS). The Forest Service first threatened to log these spectacular ancient
forests in the Diamond Lake Ranger District in 1999. Since then over 200 people have signed petitions and submitted scoping comments asking for these forests to be spared. In spite of the huge public opposition, the "preferred alternative" is to build 7.5 miles of new logging roads to
haul away 5,700 log truck loads (28.34 mmbf) of old-growth and native forests from 1,619 acres, including converting (clearcutting) 450 acres to new tree plantations for the timber industry to farm.

The Lemolo sale will degrade the forests in the roadless Oregon Cascade Recreation Area (OCRA) and the RARE II Thirsty Point roadless area, attached to Mt. Thielsen Wilderness. Logging is proposed inside the natural (not political) roadless boundaries of the OCRA(designated in
the 1984 wilderness bill as a roadless area, set aside for wildlife and recreation). The Lemolo timber sale will clearcut on Kelsay Point, a peninsula protruding into the inventoried roadless boundary. With Wilderness on three sides, the entire peninsula will be roaded and logged. The integrity of the designated Wilderness will be severely
compromised instead of preserved for the Wolverine and Lynx populations that live close by.

Near the OCRA are some of the best roadless areas over 1,000 acres left in the Umpqua -- now threatened with logging. One area above the Kelsay Valley Campground and the Wilderness Trailheads is a large 2,000-acre roadless area separated from the OCRA by only one summer-time road.
Lemolo Timber Sale will log immediately next to the campground, log about 25% of the roadless area, and riddle the mountainside with new permanent roads and clearcuts.

Other roadless areas threatened are Kelsay Valley where new roads and clearcutting will occur up to the edge of the beautiful Spring River
Special Area, and Bunker Hill where logging will occur within plain view of the Lemolo Lake Lodge. Even though hundreds of comments to the district asked them to protect the roadless areas from the Lemolo sale, the word "roadless" isn't even in the EIS. They just don't care.

The Diamond Lake Ranger District's old-growth forests and high cascade lakes attract the largest recreation use and the rarest wildlife and plants on the entire Umpqua National Forest. In spite of this, it is the sacrificial logging ground to get the cut out. Since 1995 the District has sold, or plans to sell, 9306 acres of wild, native, and
old-growth forests, converting many to perpetual tree farms to benefit only the timber industry. The 9,306 acres would produce 3,928 million board of timber that will fit on about 47,183 log trucks. If these log trucks were lined up on Interstate 5, they would stretch from Roseburg
to Seattle (357 miles if the trucks are 40 feet long). This is in addition to the unfathomable acres of clearcuts existing prior to 1995. The District plans to finish logging all their available old-growth within 50 years.

Please tell the Umpqua National Forest it's time to stop. The public will simply not allow this to continue on our forests. The Umpqua NF should choose Alternative 1, No Action, in the Lemolo Timber Sale EIS.

Write to Diamond Lake District Ranger John Ouimet at  jouimet@fs.fed.us (please include your street address on email comments), call in comments at 541-498-2531 or fax comments to 541-498-2515. Postal mail address is
2020 Toketee Ranger Station Road, Idleyld Park, Oregon, 97447 (please put a return address outside postal mail envelopes).

For more information and pictures of the beautiful and threatened forests, see our web site at:
 http://www.umpqua-watersheds.org/unf/lemolo.html. The Umpqua National Forest has the Lemolo Timber Sale EIS on-line at:  http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/umpqua/planning/ea_eis/lemolo_watershed_abstract.html


Contact Francis Eatherington at  francis@wizzards.net or George Sexton at  wafc@teleport.com for additional questions.
One Sample Comment 15.Nov.2001 13:14

starfire

Feel free to plaguerize/edit/whatever this comment
starfire
-----------------------------------------------

Your name here
RE: Lemolo TS comment
John Ouimet
Diamond Lake Ranger District, Umpqua NF
2020 Toketee Ranger Station Road
Idleyld Park, Oregon, 97447
541 498-2531 /fax: 541 498-2515

Thank you for considering this comment on the Lemolo Timber Sale EIS. This EIS has failed to address the concerns of the many concerned citizens who have expressed concern since 1999 on this issue. This area will heavily impact two roadless areas, the RARE II Thirsty Point roadless area, attached to the Mt. Thielson Wilderness, and the roadless Oregon Cascade Recreation Area (OCRA), yet no mention of these impacts, or planned mitigation for these impacts has been considered in the EIS for this sale.

Since 1999, the public has brought to your attention our concerns about the roading and logging in the largest remaining roadless areas in Oregon. Your agency has proceeded with this sale, ignoring the concerns of the public, in blatant violation of the law, as well as your agency?s mandate to preserve habitat for threatened species and to prevent further habitat destruction. If this sale goes forward using your agency?s preferred alternative, irreversible habitat destruction of old-growth and roadless-dependent species will inevitably result, as well as the loss of an important recreation area that can only further impact the recreation opportunities presently enjoyed by many.

In spite of the fact that over 200 people have written your agency during scoping and comment periods, representing a huge public opposition to this sale, the "preferred alternative" is still to build
7.5 miles of new logging roads to haul away 28.34 mmbf of old-growth and native forests from 1,619 acres, including clearcutting 450 acres to create new tree plantations for the timber industry to farm.

As many citizens have pointed out, there would be many illegal impacts of the logging and roading proposed for this sale. Near the OCRA are some of the best roadless areas over 1,000 acres left in the Umpqua. Most of these area will be irreversibly impacted by logging this connectivity corridor.

One area above the Kelsay Valley Campground and the Wilderness Trailheads is a large 2,000-acre roadless area separated from the OCRA by only one summer-time road. Lemolo Timber Sale will log immediately next to the campground, log about 25% of the roadless area, and riddle the mountainside with new permanent roads and clearcuts. This degredation is unacceptable, and will be irreversible in it?s damage to recreational and wilderness values of this rare roadless area.

Other roadless areas threatened are Kelsay Valley where new roads and clearcutting will occur up to the edge of the beautiful Spring River Special Area, and Bunker Hill where logging will occur
within plain view of the Lemolo Lake Lodge. Even though hundreds of comments to the district asked them to protect the roadless areas from the Lemolo sale, the word "roadless" isn't even in the EIS. I demand to know why public comment is being ignored, and that the EIS b e rewritten to acknowledge and assess impacts this sale will make on surrounding roadless areas.

Logging is proposed inside the natural (not political) roadless boundaries of the OCRA (designated in the 1984 wilderness bill as a roadless area, set aside for wildlife and recreation). The Lemolo timber sale
will clearcut on Kelsay Point, a peninsula protruding into the inventoried roadless boundary. With Wilderness on three sides, the entire peninsula will be roaded and logged. The integrity of the designated
Wilderness will be severely compromised instead of preserved for the Wolverine and Lynx populations that live close by.


The Diamond Lake Ranger District's old-growth forests and high cascade lakes attract the largest recreation use and the rarest wildlife and plants on the entire Umpqua National Forest. In spite of this, since 1995 the District has sold, or plans to sell, 9306 acres of wild, native, and old-growth forests, which would produce 3,928 million board of timber This is in addition to the unfathomable acres of clearcuts existing prior to 1995. The District plans to finish logging all their available old-growth within 50 years.

All these facts are well known by your agency, and have been pointed out numerous times over the years. It is time to stop selling off Oregon and America?s heritage for short-term profit, and provide the service your agency was created for in the early part of this century: Preservation of the Forest Reserves, for the benefit of future generations. The Umpqua NF should choose Alternative 1, No Action, in the Lemolo Timber Sale EIS.

I expect your timely reply, and for your agency to do the right thing.

Sincerely,

your name

Isn't it due on the 23rd? 15.Nov.2001 13:16

starfire

I could have sworn this comment was due by the 23rd of November... the day after thanksgiving is kind of a wierd due date though..

starfire